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newyorker:

From Larissa MacFarquhar’s 2003 Profile of Quentin Tarantino:

“For every monologue he writes about an old movie or TV show, he writes one about European hamburgers or tipping waitresses or eating pork. … The love of minutiae, like the love of pop culture, is a form of nostalgia—a junk-food version of Proust’s madeleine. But, unlike madeleine-nostalgia—nostalgia for a lost world, an unrecoverable childhood—minutiae-nostalgia is nostalgia for a world that still exists, for a life you’re still living.”

Take a look at more classic New Yorker stories about filmmakers.

Photograph by Ruven Afanador

(via journalofanobody)

Source: newyorker.com
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"So, when we are hoping for rescue, a voice tells us that hope is in vain, yet it is powerless hope alone that allows us to draw a single breath. All contemplation can do no more than patiently trace the ambiguity of melancholy in ever new configurations. Truth is inseparable from the illusory belief that from the figures of the unreal one day, in spite of all, real deliverance will come."

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Adorno, Minima Moralia II.78. “Over the hills.” Translated by E.F.N. Jephcott. (via adornography)

Beautiful.

Source: adornography
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"This is a thoroughly unsatisfactory, contradictory answer, one that makes a mockery of both principle and practice. But perhaps the fault lies in the question and not only in me."

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Adorno, Minima Moralia I.33, “Out of the firing-line.” Translated by E.F.N. Jephcott

Pretend I wrote this at the end of all of my essays.

(via adornography)

Source: adornography
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What are household pets? An indication of the failure of human relationships and narcissism. Neutered, they regulate castration anxiety.

What are wrist watches? Something to absorb the anguish of death.

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Ambience is a new form of repression - society becoming controlled through its inclusion in the spectacle of consumption. In the ambient order, the consumer object itself is less important than its value in the ambient harmony of consumer signs. We are immersed in a modern world of signs which destroy tradition. Our experience of plastics, synthetics, pastel colours, lighting systems, replace earlier “living” materials like wood, stucco and cotton.

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According to Baudrillard, affluent society ‘mutates’ the human species - we are no longer surrounded by people but by objects. This is a new phase of capitalism based on mass consumption. Work, leisure, nature and culture were once separate and produced complexity in our real life. Now they’re mixed, massaged, climate-controller and domesticated in the simple act of perpetual shopping.

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"Writing, collecting and circulating documents were foundations of imperial power. While the ultimate basis of imperial authority was force or the threat of force, colonial states fetishized written records and the value of documentation. J. S. Mill underlined this in 1852, as he noted ‘the whole of the Government of India is carried on in writing’, suggesting that ‘no other [government] probably has a system of recordation so complete.’18 Mill’s observation on the superior extent and thickness of the colonial archive underlines the pivotal role of colonialism in the constitution of state practices and modernity itself. Recent scholarship has emphasized that modernity was not fashioned in Europe and then projected out to colonies in the periphery, but rather that the key enumerative and surveillance apparatuses of the modern state – from fingerprinting to the survey, from the census to the passport – were elaborated and refined in colonial contexts.19 In light of this, the precociousness of kaghazi raj (rule by paper) in British India is less surprising, as it embodied the bureaucratization of modern governance, a process that Richard Drayton has recently identified as one of the most durable, if overlooked, legacies of Britain’s global empire."

- Tony Ballantyne, ”Orientalism and Race: Aryanism in the British Empire”
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"But you are a poet and need not go into the fields to bring back flowers. Don’t complain about not having learned. There is nothing to know. Even what is called technical competence is not properly speaking knowledge, because it does not exist outside of the mysterious association of our memory and the skill acquired by our own inventiveness when it comes in contact with words. Knowledge, in the sense of a thing that is all done outside ourselves and that can be learned as in the sciences, counts for nothing in art. On the contrary, it is when the scientific connections between words have disappeared from our minds and have taken on a life in which the chemical elements are forgotten in a new individuality, that the technique, the skill that recognizes their antipathies, humors their wishes, knows their beauty, conveys their forms, assorts their affinities, can begin. And this exists only when a creature is a soul and no longer so much carbon, so much phosphorus, etc. So you love words, you don’t harm them, you play with them, you confide your secrets to them, you teach them how to paint, you teach them how to sing."

Source: violentwavesofemotion
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"You are quite right – I am not moved by any ‘love’ of this sort, and for two reasons: I have never in my life ‘loved’ any people or collective – neither the German people, nor the French, nor the American, nor the working class or anything of that sort. I indeed love ‘only’ my friends and the only kind of love I know of and believe in is the love of persons. Secondly, this ‘love of the Jews’ would appear to me, since I am myself Jewish, as something rather suspect. I cannot love myself or anything which I know is part and parcel of my own person. To clarify this, let me tell you of a conversation I had in Israel with a prominent political personality who was defending the – in my opinion disastrous – non-separation of religion and state in Israel. What [she] said – I am not sure of the exact words any more – ran something like this: ‘You will understand that, as a socialist, I, of course, do not believe in God; I believe in the Jewish people.’ I found this a shocking statement and, being too shocked, I did not reply at the time. But I could have answered: the greatness of this people was once that it believed in God, and believed in Him in such a way that its trust and love towards Him was greater than its fear. And now this people believes only in itself? What good can come out of that? Well, in this sense I do not ‘love’ the Jews, nor do I ‘believe’ in them; I merely belong to them as a matter of course, beyond dispute or argument."

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"By comparison to our ideas of liberation, emancipation and individual autonomy, which exhaust themselves chasing their own shadows, how much more subtle and proud at the same time, is the idea, which still survives in oriental wisdom, that someone else has control over your life, is planning it, determining it, satisfying it, according to the terms of an electoral pact by which you agree to stand down, when things are going against you, from something which, in any case, does not belong to you and which it is much more pleasant to enjoy without constantly having to take responsibility for it at every waking moment. There is nothing to prevent you, in return, from looking after someone else’s life - something people are more skilled at than looking after their own - and so on, from one person to the next, with each of us being relieved of the burden of living, truly free and no longer exposed to their own madness, but only to the ritual or romantic intervention of the other in the process of their own life."

- Jean Baudrillard, Cool Memories
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