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poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

Players drew cards corresponding to colony names, then had to deploy cards representing assets like boats, engineers, colonists, schools, and equipment, in order to win cards representing the exports of the various colonies.  “Images on the game,”Getty Research Institute curator Isotta Poggi writes in her blog post on the document, “provide a vivid picture of the vast variety of resources, including animals, plants, and minerals, that the colonies provided to France.” Cartoons on the cards depict coal (mined by a figure clearly intended to be a “native”), rubber, wood, and even wild animals.

Along the way, players needed to avoid pitfalls like sickness, “laziness,” and intemperance (illustrated by a cartoon of a red-cheeked white man in khakis and a white hat, served by a “native” in “traditional” dress). Once the cards representing a colony’s major exports had been won, the colony was considered “exploitée,” and was out of the game.  

read more on this board game designed to teach french children to admire french colonialism and enlist them in the colonial project here. (via)

Source: poppoppopblowblowbubblegum
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emojinalart:

Liberty Leading the People - Eugene Delacroix

Requested by Anonymous

Source: emojinalart
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emojinalart:

Napoleon Crossing the Alps - Jacques Louis David
Photo Set

occupt:

emoji-nation. part 2.

brilliant

(via solipsism)

Source: occupt
Quote

"[With the spread of markets] there will come a time when everything that people consider as inalienable will become an object of exchange, of traffic, and can be alienated. This is the time when the very things which till then had been communicated, but never exchanged, given, but never sold, acquired but never bought - virtue, love, conviction, knowledge, conscience - when everything, in short, passed into commerce. It is the time of general corruption, of universal venality. It has left remaining no other nexus between man and man other than naked self-interest and callous cash payment."

-

Karl Marx, The Poverty of Philosophy (via fluidstaccato)

(via musaafer)

Yes, yes, yes.

(via musaafer)

Source: fluidstaccato
Quote

"Man has no nature; what he has is history."

- José Ortega y Gasset (via kropotkink)

(via 11312334348939013-1312314555)

Source: kropotkink
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goodmorningleftside:

fuckingfreud:

High school teacher. Kuban, USSR. 1966.
Eve Arnold

Nice!

goodmorningleftside:

fuckingfreud:

High school teacher. Kuban, USSR. 1966.

Eve Arnold

Nice!

Source: fuckingfreud
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archives-dada:

Jean Cocteau, Lettre à Picabia et photomontage avec le cheval de ”Parade”, Bibliothèque Jacques Doucet, s.d.

(via derrierelasalledebains)

Source: archives-dada
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lisztomaria:

The Virgin Suicides (1999)

(via jaimelannister)

Source: neoapori
Quote

"I claim that melancholy occurs not when we lose the object, but precisely when the object is here but we lose the desire for it. This is why modern philosophical subject cogito is deeply melancholic. Everything is here, but you no longer desire it. And so I claim that this is the enigma of modernity. It’s not some kind of protestant ethics which prohibits I don’t know what. It’s that you lose desire, and prohibitions come — precisely a desperate, secondary attempt to resuscitate desire."

- Slavoj Žižek, from Melancholia And The Cartesian Subject (via thoughtsofam)

(via journalofanobody)

Source: heteroglossia
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theparisreview:

Nude Reading by Roy Lichtenstein, 1994, 12 color relief print.

From the portfolio “Readers & Readings” in our Fall 2003 issue, Jeanette Winterson writes of the print, “Roy Lichtenstein’s Nude Reading is not locked in time, because she is freed by art. She is naked. She is in her own room. She is in her own time. She is her own time. It’s quite normal for her to read a book that hasn’t been written yet.”

Source: theparisreview